(no subject)

2015-Dec-05, Saturday 22:59
alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
Can I get someone to read through my short story and make sure it still makes sense in new draft? 2500 words. Urban fantasy. Content notes for violence against women. I've got till 23:59 Pacific on Monday to turn it in.

(no subject)

2015-Dec-05, Saturday 21:37
alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
I go to rinse out my ice cream bowl and I get the perfect way to open the rewrite of my story. I come back to the keyboard and wut r werds. :(

(no subject)

2015-Dec-02, Wednesday 18:52
alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
Need to XYZ, can't XYZ because need to ABC. Need to ABC, can't ABC because need to XYZ.

Need to XYZABC, can't because too stressed that XYZABC aren't done.

I used to have executive function. (Like, in high school.) What happened to it?

(no subject)

2015-Nov-08, Sunday 22:13
alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
*reviews instructor comments on "Connect the Dots"*

*opens new Scrivener tab to revise "Connect the Dots"*

*stares at blank page*

*idly wonders whether professor would have pointed out that the bad guys need to be at least a little sympathetic too if it were not true that both professor and bad guys are white men*

(no subject)

2015-Nov-08, Sunday 15:01
alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
Okay, pausing the Week 6 lecture eight minutes into the twenty-eight to argue with the professor: Why the hell is "advancing the plot" not an intended function of dialogue in prose fiction? Or even just in literary fiction? Maybe it is just that I'm writing a genre that is not the literary genre, but my story that I wrote for his class, most of the plot happens in the dialogue and not the thoughts of the narrator. Because the story lies in the character interactions.

(And also the editor who had a look at "Inherit the Flame" told me I shouldn't ought to spend the first third of the story entirely in the narrator's head! ...I still really need to rewrite that. Especially in light of the "everything tastes like mashed potatoes" metaphor for depression, because that gives Akinyi and Meredith a really compelling reason to want to stay Underhill: life doesn't taste like mashed potatoes!)

But seriously. What is the purpose of divorcing dialogue from plot? "To distinguish prose fiction from television and movies" doesn't count!

(no subject)

2015-Nov-08, Sunday 14:35
alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
Holy shit Raymond Carver's "Cathedral" is actually not a downer. I mean, it's not a pleasant read: the narrator is viciously ableist and casually racist (though it is vintage 1983 and I'm not sure of when that falls with respect to the evolution of terminology to describe PoC in general and black people in specific). But he's less ableist at the end of the story than he is at the start. Robert, who's described hella lots more often as "the blind man" than as "Robert", does most of the work to accomplish this, and the narrator does not much work at all. But, like. A small victory, hard fought for, is still a victory, and the story is not a downer.

(no subject)

2015-Nov-02, Monday 09:47
alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
Select an exchange of dialogue from your story, and provide it at the start of the blog. Analyze that exchange, pointing out its weaknesses, and articulating why—precisely—those elements are weak. Revise the exchange to make it stronger. Finally, analyze the revised version to articulate why it is stronger; be specific and precise.

AAAAAA.

ETA: Actually no, on reread, this might be doable: this is from the climax of the story, so if you'd rather read the whole story first, then tell me that so I can send it to you, rather than you clicking the cut )

(no subject)

2015-Oct-19, Monday 12:18
alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
I HAVE A STORY DRAAAAFT WOOT WOOT

(no subject)

2015-Oct-13, Tuesday 20:28
alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
"Chopin in Winter", Stuart Dybek: bleh.

"Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?", Joyce Carol Oates: actively appalling. tw: older guys creeping on teenage girls )

:(

(no subject)

2015-Oct-12, Monday 20:17
alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
Things the current Advanced Fiction Writing assignments are encouraging me to do: succumb to my tendency to endlessly fix the first bit and never write the second. :(

(no subject)

2015-Oct-12, Monday 09:46
alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
I'm not gonna be able to do the next assignment in one non-complicated sentence. Write a new first paragraph of a story. The paragraph should introduce conflict and stakes, as well as creating sympathy for the story’s protagonist and verisimilitude. That's too much to put on one or two sentences!

(no subject)

2015-Oct-10, Saturday 14:20
alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
...if next writing assignment is "one paragraph", I'm doing "one sentence" just to make a point to my classmates. Not a run-on sentence, either! Like maybe just:
"Who died and made you queen?" Carol muttered, and too late realized Sandy wasn't out of earshot.
Because them some LONG paragraphs my classmates are producing.
alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
Richard Ford's "Rock Springs": racist (though possibly character not author), classist (ditto), yech. I feel no sympathy for anyone except the black woman and the little white girl, neither of whom is a major character in the story.

Mary Gaitskill's "A Romantic Weekend": pretty sure that's all on the abuse side of the line between abuse and BDSM. I don't sympathize with the woman so much as pity her.

And these are the stories for "build sympathy for the protagonist" week?

(no subject)

2015-Sep-25, Friday 10:19
alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
Observation inspired by lecture video: It is easier to create a believable story within a dominant culture than a non-dominant one. Especially if the intended audience is the dominant culture. Professor Larison was talking about how "we've all been there" with the details of the picnic scene in the Flagstaff story, but stories like NK Jemisin's "The Effluent Engine", we really, really have not all been there. Jemisin's protagonist's experience of racism is not common to all of Jemisin's audience, in particular the white parts of said audience. Jemisin also has an uphill battle in that she's writing speculative, not realistic, fiction ("The Effluent Engine" is specifically alt-history steampunk). Prof. Larison says to write to convince the most skeptical reader; in the case of a speculative fiction writer, that most skeptical reader is guaranteed to not be a speculative fiction reader. It seems to me that these are similar, though orthogonal, problems.

There is something fundamentally unfair about this.

(no subject)

2015-Sep-25, Friday 09:09
alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
Dorothy Allison's "River of Names": trigger warnings out the wazoo. Suicide, rape, murder, epic family dysfunction. (Queer protagonist, but ye gods does she have a downer of a family history.)

Richard Bausch's "All the Way in Flagstaff, Arizona": maybe not a good read for someone with alcohol problems. Also contains epic family dysfunction.

Why are the assigned-reading stories always so down?

Also. Locate one surprise in the first pages of "River of Names" that caused you to believe in the story? Provide that surprise here and explain why it surprised you and how that surprise caused you to believe in the fictional dream. Nope, not this story. Ugh.

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alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
let me hear your voice tonight

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